Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 54
CNNW 45
CNN 30
MSNBC 21
CSPAN 20
FBC 20
CSPAN2 19
CURRENT 18
FOXNEWS 15
KRCB (PBS) 7
WHUT (Howard University Television) 7
KNTV (NBC) 6
KGO (ABC) 5
WETA 5
WRC (NBC) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 331
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 333 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
diplomat i canic talks continue in egypt, israel's leaders are preparing to take what they call operation pillar and defense. theyprominent netanyahuprime minister netanyahu and his cabinet deciding what to do. they said if israel was going to invade gaza, they would have done so already. after israel killed hamas' military commander in airstrike three israeli civilians have been killed and 70 wounded missile strikes that reached as far as tel aviv, 50 miles from gaza's northern border. but israel's iron dome defense system has knocked down hundreds of palestinian missiles, limiting casualties and damage. they have launched 1300 airstrikes against targets in gaza. 106 palestinians have been killed in the fighting. hospital officials say half of those killed were civilians. however, israeli officials say they believe the majority of those killed were militants for hamas or one of the associated palestinian terror groups. in bangkok thailand, president obama said sunday the u.s. while working to de-escalate the situation and end the fighting would stand behind its ally. >> we're fully suppo
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
but while preparing israeli troops are gathering on the border. even as egypt works to broker a deal, former british prime minister tony blair traveled to tel aviv to sit down with israeli president perez. >> i hope that over the coming days we can achieve cessation on a basis that is sustainable. >> and joining me now from gaza, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman. what's the latest on what's happening in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they wa
with egypt's president about working together to try to preserve peace and security in that region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling the ambassador to israel in protest. for more on the situation, we want to get to our senior colleague in the region. that is martin fletcher. he is live in tel aviv with the very latest right now. martin, give us a sense if you can. we already have a good understanding of the tensions between israel and iran. the tensions in recent days between israel and its neighbor to the sort of north, syria. and now this new test between israel and new islamist government in egypt. what should we be watching for? >> reporter: well, this potentially is very dangerous situation. on the brink -- on press hiss, israel attacking gaza killing the leader yesterday who by the way was the top of israel's hit list for ten years. but just as significant was israel's concentration on the rocket facilities, the storage of hamas in gaza, focusing on the long distance rockets. israel wants to eliminate the r
, thoush their faces above ground in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt's president about working together to try to preserve peace and security in that region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling the ambassador to israel in protest. for more on the situation, we want to get to our senior colleague in the region. that is martin fletcher. he is live in tel aviv with the very latest right now. martin, give us a sense if you can. we already have a good understanding of the tensions between israel and iran. the tensions in recent days between israel and its neighbor to the sort of north, syria. and now this new test between israel and new islamist government in egypt. what should we be watching for? >> reporter: well, this potentially is very dangerous situation. on the brink -- on press hiss, israel attacking gaza killing the leader yesterday who by the way was the top of israel's hit list for ten years. but just as significant was israel's concentration on the rocket facilities, the
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
're waaching fox 45 good day baltimore. >> thousands of christians are leaving egypt in fear. >> it is an exitous of biblical proportions just over the last 12 months. >> as the shift in political power favors is lack an islam and their radical forms. >> american christians are very concerned about their brothers and sisters in christ here in egypt. what should they do? >> the exitous of christians from egypt electiio day has arrived. the turnouu in marylann and down. ttnighh on fox 45 news at fivee. >> i was too young to understand what to do. >> lee: he went face to face with a demon, and got an offer he couldn't refuse.
protests throughout the muslim world today after friday prayers came to an end. in egypt, crowds in cairo and alexandria waved palestinian flags and chanted anti-israeli slogans. thousands of people also turned out in yemen to denounce the israeli offensive. and in turkey, a one-time israeli ally, people in istanbul called for the death of the jewish state. >> brown: and for more on the conflict, we are joined by hisham melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thoand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the el
after his body was kissed by egypt's prime minister during a tour of a gaza hospital. we need to warn you about the video you're about to see. it's heartbreaking and may be considered disturbing to many of our viewers. for our report, cnn visited the child's home that neighbors said had been bombed five hours previously. neighbors and family members told cnn they heard an aircraft before the explosion. the israeli military told cnn today it did not carry out any air strikes at the time of the child's death. the israeli defense force says it stopped attacks because of the visit of egypt's prime minister, raising questions about what cause the fatal blast. among the other possibilities, the misfire of an hamas rocket intended for israel. cnn's crew in gaza said it saw two rockets passing overhead, apparently fired not far from where the boy lived. >>> since the air strikes began wednesday, at least 65 palestinians and 3 israelis have been killed and neither side is showing any signs of backing down. cnn's senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in gaza city right now. sara, w
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
in egypt and tunisia to push this forward and to overcome the increasing polarization. >> i will add to and dan's remarks and say in terms of technicalities and specific steps that need to be taken to reconfigure the domestic security establishment, they are all laid out there in a study that was put together by a group of civil society leaders as well as a group of meetings from the securities sector, commonly known as police for egypt. there's a great deal of debate within civil society about the exact concrete actionable step that needs to be taken in the short run and in the long run some of these steps when themselves to the type of changes that would require the liberation. this is one issue to keep in mind. the dialog's ideas are out there but what is missing as dan mentioned is the political will, the seriousness to engage in dialogue on this issue, even if they're not ready to adopt policy recommendations, there needs to be some kind of ongoing dialogue on these issues but at the same time i want to point out the issue of political will is important, there will always be a c
and jerusalem, they're being funneled through the sudan to egypt, to gaza, to hamas. they're coming right through the sudan, and the sudan is up to their eyeballs. you've got president morsi who has been very chum my with the president of sudan. they're very tight now and the plot thickens. >> this idea that morsi of the muslim brotherhood is somehow a moderate when it comes to dealing with israel is just fanciful. the threat here is that if israel backs off from its present posture with respect to gaza, more missiles will come in from iran through sudan, and when and if israel decides to do something about the iranian nuclear weapons program, the israeli air force will be in a very difficult position because it can't be in three places at once. it can't be over iran and over gaza and over the valley trying to take out hezbollah missiles. >> of course, it was over sudan taking out the munitions factory that they believe was in iran less than a month ago. they can't be that place, either. >> right. no. i think this is a decision iran has made to demonstrate what many people have feared for
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
in the middle east. riots breaking out in egypt after president morsi effectively declares himself a dictator. welcome to "america live", everyone. hope you had a nice thanksgiving. now back to the news. i'm megyn kelly. that press briefing, the very first before after the thanksgiving holidays. there is a lot to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are po
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
's questions about whether egypt might get involved in some way, turkey as well. do you think -- do you see them rallying to hamas or not? >> the one government that's very sensitive to hamas and very friendly to hamas ironically is the morsi government in egypt. there have always been historic ties between gaza and egypt. egyptians are very sensitive to everything that goes on in gaza. >> many tunnels from egypt go into gaza to get supplies. >> absolutely. in fact, under mubarak it was much easier because mubarak couldn't care less about hamas. this is a very different issue here, because the muslim brotherhood in egypt really is the mothership, if you will, of hamas and other such organizations. but what will the egyptians do. they have recalled their ambassador from israel and they have told their people that look, president morsi is talking to president obama about bringing the fighting to a halt so that's one thing that we can look forward to. one thing that's very important, tomorrow is friday. there has already been calls for massive demonstration, a million people march, in cairo ag
as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxe
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 333 (some duplicates have been removed)